Good Golly Miss Molly


How cute is she?!

As if selling a house, buying a house and moving wasn’t enough change for one year we recently added a new family member.

Meet Molly.

I wasn’t actively looking for a second dog but a friend was fostering some puppies, and Caden had been asking for a smaller dog. He wanted one he could carry around and fit in this lap. We love our big dog but he’s not exactly lapdog material (although he tries hard to be one).

Without the boys knowing, I visited the puppies — a Chihuahua mix — and even took Hudson to see how he felt about it. He thought the puppies were fun at first … until I decided to bring one home!

Big dog, little dog

Actually, Hudson’s adjusted better than I thought. Molly is a good little playmate. She’s about the size of some of his toys (ha!) but even though she’s 1/10th his size she doesn’t act it. She’s fierce and picks fights and doesn’t back down even when he sometimes sends her sliding across the room. She just pounces back for more.

Hudson is very gentle with her too. He plays and rough-houses but not too rough and no one gets hurt.

She can be a little toy thief

Perhaps the biggest struggle for Hudson is she takes his toys. It’s just like children. She wants the one toy he’s decided to play with. He’s so gentle he often lets her take it, albeit with an exasperated sigh of defeat. They’ll fight a little over the antlers Hudson loves to chew. He’ll growl and snap at her when she tries to steal it, but eventually, unless I step in, he’ll let her take his favorite antler too.

This is where they can be found most days while I’m working. Hudson, my protector, always at my feet and by my side and Molly some place comfortable, the carpeted stairs or a spot of sunlight streaming through the windows.

Welcome to the family, Molly!

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Adopting Hudson


Last March we adopted Hudson, a three-month old red-heeler puppy.

The boys had been begging for a dog for years, as boys their age are prone to do. I knew in my heart that it might be a good addition for them to have a companion to play around with, an animal to care for, all kinds of life lessons and responsibilities would be learned, plus the joy of a pet.

But I also knew in my head that a puppy would be additional work and mess for us all (ahem, me!) and we’re gone so much of the time I worried would we have the time needed not to just care for a dog but to really love and spend time with him.

I mentioned in passing to a family at church that the boys wanted a dog and that I was researching different breeds that might fit in with our life — something low maintenance but fun, trainable but able to be on its own while we’re gone during the day.

A young man at church heard me and said his uncle had a litter of red and blue heeler puppies that he was giving away. I had never heard of a red heeler but when I looked it up it sounded like a possible fit.

We drove out to see the puppies and I assured the boys emphatically: We will NOT leave with a puppy today. We are going to see them, then we’ll talk about it and see what we think.

Of course we thought they were all so cute and adorable little fur balls. But I stuck with my guns and left without a dog.

A few days later I asked my parents (my dad knows dogs) to ride out there with us and give me their opinion on this breed and if these puppies in particular were a good choice for us. We will NOT leave with a dog today, I said.

Dad’s opinion was favorable, so armed with all of the research I’d done and the opinion of my dad, we selected our puppy and made arrangements to pick him up a few days later after we’d had the chance to buy all the things we’d need.

When we picked him up and got him in the car, he cried little sad whines, missing his puppy family I’m sure. But he quickly bonded with the boys and they (we) became his new family.

He’s been such a precious addition and all those things I thought he’d add, he did and more.